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26-10-2016 | Image & researcher picture: Courtesy S. Lammes

Is digital mapping the new media?

Over the past months, a sudden influx of ‘Pokémon Go’ players could be observed across the globe. Youngsters, people of all ages scrutinise their surroundings silently, using their smartphones to catch those digital creatures with unlikely names. How could such a phenomenon take over the world so fast? Part of the answer may be the game’s strong interaction with the real-world and its impressive mapping, offering a whole new virtual experience of spaces that seem to be familiar and yet so different.

19-07-2016 | Researcher picture © Michael De Volder

Carbon Nanotubes: manufacturing steps to commercialisation

Stronger than steel, conducting electricity better than copper and heat better than diamonds: these are some of the promises held by carbon nanomaterials. Although not as well-known as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) show these properties – offering also a great advantage: they can be produced in larger quantities. Prof. Michael De Volder now explores new ways to manufacture CNTs-based devices with optimal features, potentially opening the way to their broader commercial use.

04-05-2016 | illustration ©www.istockphotos.com

Experiences and perception of punishment: an insight into the life of prisoners

Women and sex offenders have been relatively neglected in existing sociological studies on prisons, particularly in debates about the relative severity of penal systems. Still, Dr Ben Crewe finds the treatment of these two prisoner groups symptomatic of wider social sensibilities. These and other issues will be investigated in the frame of COMPEN, an extensive comparative analysis of different prisoner groups and penal jurisdictions.

02-05-2016 | © picture

What does aspirin do to you?

Acetylsalicylic acid, most commonly known as aspirin, was already part of the Egyptian pharmacopeia, used also in ancient Greece and in the Middle Ages to break fevers. Taken all over the world to kill pain and reduce inflammation, today aspirin helps to prevent heart attacks, strokes and blood clots. Its emerging role in preventing and treating cancer is on the rise too. But how does this drug act on your blood cells? ERC grantee Prof Valerie O’Donnell works on the answer.

02-05-2016 | Research picture: Melting Andean glaciers: view from water reservoir in Chivay (Peru), where water is precious and scarce. ©Astrid Stensrud

Addressing the crises of an ‘overheated’ world

Different responses might be given to global challenges. For example, how should the vanishing of a glacier be tackled? Prof. Thomas Eriksen aims to understand the economic, environmental and cultural transitions the world is going through and the responses created by local communities in order to offer valuable advice to our policymakers and leaders.

29-04-2016 | Cover: © Nature/Marta Mirazon Lahr

Discovery in Kenya sheds light on the origins of warfare

A ground-breaking anthropological discovery took place in East Africa, where ERC Advanced grantee Dr Marta Mirazón Lahr and her team have been studying human origins. At the excavation site in Nataruk in northern Kenya, they have stumbled upon a real archaeological rarity – the earliest historical evidence of warfare.

09-03-2016 | Image: Dispersed reference interferometer (DRI) ©University of Huddersfield

High accuracy measurements to meet manufacturing needs

The advanced technologies designed by researchers working on the SURFUND project go beyond the current state-of-the-art techniques in metrology, the science of measurements applied to manufacturing and other industrial processes. These novel measurement tools could have a large application potential in optics, aerospace, automotive, precision engineering, electronics and biotech industry and they have already attracted the attention of several companies working in these fields.The innovations generated by this ERC project could bring significant economic benefits to Europe.  

21-01-2016 | © P Sankowski

Real-life problems realistically solved

Is a precise answer always better than a slightly less detailed one? Not necessarily. Some problems could take forever to compute and tie up vast IT capacity. Where solutions are needed urgently, e.g. in business or manufacturing, near-enough can be more than enough. ERC-funded research has produced a library of fast, powerful approximation algorithms.