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24-05-2019 | ©iStockphoto CIPhotos

Versatile nanoparticles take aim at complex bone diseases

Multifunctional nanoparticles being developed by EU-funded researchers are set to revolutionise treatments for complex bone diseases, enabling novel therapies for hundreds of millions of people worldwide suffering from bone cancer, bacterial bone infections and osteoporosis.

17-04-2019 | © iStockphoto.com/yangna

Scientists recreate our dusty origins

We are all made of stardust! But what is cosmic dust and how is it made? An EU-funded project is recreating cosmic dust by simulating interstellar conditions in the laboratory and developing innovative processes that could lead to benefits for communication, transport and nanotechnology - boosting industry's competitiveness.

03-08-2018 | Rayleigh Taylor Instability ©DYCON

New approaches to controlling dynamics

Once limited to modelling physical problems in engineering, today Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) are used by a diverse array of fields, from natural resources to meteorology, aeronautics, oil and gas and biomedicine – to name only a few. But key mathematical issues remain unsolved, particularly when addressing their control, a must in technological transfer. The ERC-funded DYCON project aims to find answers.

11-07-2018 | ©Courtesy of MSc. Gizem Altay (IBEC)

Growing intestinal organoids to open new research avenues in gut diseases

Epithelial tissues cover all body surfaces and line most of our organs, internal cavities and passageways, including the digestive tract. Prof. Elena Martínez is engineering intestinal epithelial tissues that mimic the physiological characteristics of human intestinal tissue with the aim of advancing the in vitro modelling of diseases, the preclinical screening for drug efficacy and toxicity, and the understanding of organ development.

18-01-2018 | © picture

Bacteria under your feet

Over 500 dominant species identified in the first global atlas of world soil bacteria In cooperation with Universidad Rey Juan Carlos – URJC

An international team of researchers, including ERC grantee Fernando T. Maestre from Universidad Rey Juan Carlos (URJC), pieced together a global atlas of soil bacteria. The study, published today in Science, identifies some five hundred species of dominant bacteria living in soils worldwide. The findings, based on EU-funded research, could open new paths to improve soil fertility and increase agricultural production.

20-07-2017 | © picture

Building a multi-level simulation of organogenesis

Organogenesis is the process by which different cells grow, differentiate and interact with each other to create large structures, such as the heart, the brain, a limb.  But what are the mechanisms behind these molecular, cellular and tissue interactions that lead to the construction of an organ? Prof. James Sharpe’s team is developing the first 3D computer model to better understand this complex process.

22-04-2016 | © picture

ERC grantee uncovers genetic clue to animals' evolutionary success

A team of researchers at the Institute of Evolutionary Biology in Barcelona deciphered the genetic mechanisms responsible for the evolutionary success of animals, including humans. The findings give insight on how life evolved from its simple one-cell form to complex multi-cellular organisms. The results, published on 21/4/2016 in Cell journal, may also provide hints how the life will evolve in future.

22-03-2016 | © illustration: Xavier Salvatella /IRB Barcelona

Treatment for late-stage prostate cancer patients: getting closer to a solution

People suffering from prostate cancer usually go through surgery and radiotherapy. When these treatments are ineffective, drugs are used to stop the tumour progression. However, after a few years, patients stop responding to this therapy. Prof. Xavier Salvatella from the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) may have found how to address this resistance, caused by alterations of the androgen receptor protein including mutations. 

15-12-2015 | illustration © Semiarid landscape in Argentina - Juan Gaitán

New insight into links between biodiversity and climate change mitigation in global drylands

Both tropical forests and areas with extensive forest coverage are fundamental in tackling the effects of climate change on Earth. However, the environmental importance of arid, semi-arid and dry-subhumid ecosystems – also referred to as drylands - is less well known. Drylands cover about 40% of the Earth's land surface and support 38% of human population. With his BIOCOM project Dr Fernando T. Maestre, a 2009 ERC Starting grantee from the Universidad Rey Juan Carlos (Spain), investigates the role of biodiversity in enhancing the ability of drylands to maintain essential functions. Some of these functions have the capacity to combat the consequences of climate change and desertification in drylands worldwide.

14-06-2015 | illustration © Semiarid landscape in Argentina - Juan Gaitán

Minimizing the effects of climate change on drylands

Both tropical forests and areas with extensive forest coverage are fundamental in tackling the effects of climate change on Earth. However, the environmental importance of arid, semi-arid and dry-subhumid ecosystems – also referred to as drylands - is less well known. Drylands cover about 40% of the Earth's land surface and support 38% of human population. With his BIOCOM project Dr Fernando T. Maestre, a 2009 ERC Starting grantee from the Universidad Rey Juan Carlos (Spain), investigates the role of biodiversity in enhancing the ability of drylands to maintain essential functions. Some of these functions have the capacity to combat the consequences of climate change and desertification in drylands worldwide.