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03-04-2017 | © picture

Promises and pitfalls of digital gaming

Thorsten Quandt is the Professor of Online Communication at the University of Münster, Germany. He is currently the Managing Director of the Department of Communication in Münster. From 2009-2012, he was the Chair of Online Communication and Interactive Media at the University of Hohenheim. He has a particular interest in digital games, interactive media and online journalism. His research project funded by the ERC shed light on the social foundations of online gaming.

Originally published in March 2017 as part of the multimedia campaign "ERC - 10 years – 10 portraits."

17-03-2017 | Illustration & portrait: © Damian Evans

Frontiers of archeology: Discovery in Cambodia

Dr Damian Evans from the École française d’Extrême-Orient and his team used a laser radar mounted on a helicopter to scan the jungle in Cambodia in 2015. What resulted was one of the most important archeological discoveries in recent years.

17-03-2017 | Portrait: © Max Planck Society, credit David Ausserhofer | Illustration: Automated carbohydrate synthesizer © Max Planck Society, credit David Ausserhofer

Innovative vaccines and diagnostics open new opportunities for European companies

Glycans are complex sugars surrounding most of our body’s cells. They play an essential role in cell communication and within the immune system. Prof. Peter Seeberger’s ERC-funded research has focused on these important targets for drugs to develop new vaccines and therapies against infectious diseases. His results have led to several spinoffs and the creation of high-skill jobs in Germany and Switzerland.

20-01-2017 | Automatic electrical testing of hybrid CMOS/magnetic chips from HYMAGINE

Hot electronics get magnetic cool

The EU-funded HYMAGINE project has combined conventional electronic transistors with new magnetism-based ‘spintronic’ devices to improve information processing speeds and reduce energy consumption.

27-07-2016 | © picture

The cognitive art of team sports

While on court, beach volleyball players need to act as a whole in order to prevent the ball from touching the sand: in a fraction of a second - just before the opponent's hand spikes the ball - the passer has to predict and adjust to the attacker's action as well as to their teammate's block position. Thanks to her Consolidator Grant, cognitive science professor Natalie Sebanz is studying the cognitive and psychological mechanisms underlying joint action expertise – in other words, how individuals learn skilled actions, such as those performed by professional athletes, together.

22-07-2016 | © picture

Towards new quality sports broadcast

Imagine your favourite football team entering a stadium. An army of wireless cameras is following the players to give you the best possible view – of the whole pitch, of the chanting crowd, of each footballer, from the tip of his head to the grass blades he treads with his cleats. Thanks to Prof. Leif Oxenløwe’s research, this kind of wireless ultra-high definition television broadcasting can one day become a reality.

 

17-07-2016 | © picture

New weapons in the fight against antibiotic resistance

Antibiotics are amongst the most crucial discoveries in modern medicine. However, the surge in microbial resistance to these, now common, drugs is a challenge that medical researchers work hard to tackle. Prof. Susanne Häußler from the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research believes early diagnostic tools could shift the paradigm of how we battle this problem.

16-07-2016 | © picture

Playing dirty against allergies and asthma

Parents may threat at the idea of their children playing in fields and sheds, but research shows that those who grew up in farms, where this is common occurrence, are less likely to suffer from allergies and asthma. Prof. Erika von Mutius leads a team of researchers, that uses this knowledge to investigate how we could treat such conditions more effectively.

15-07-2016 | © picture

Minerals reveal the flow patterns inside the Earth

The Earth is made of layers, just like a big onion, composed of different materials. However, the compounds forming these layers are not static, flowing from one stratum to another, following patterns still not entirely understood. Prof. Patrick Cordier tries to model the real conditions minerals are subjected to beneath the Earth’s crust. His aim is to understand the forces driving tectonic plates so we can better comprehend phenomena like earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

14-07-2016 | Image: Friedhelm Albrecht@University of Tübingen - Portrait: University of Tübingen

A personalised cure for head-and-neck cancer patients

Thousands of new cases of head-and-neck cancer - which includes cancer of the larynx, throat, mouth, nose and salivary glands - are diagnosed every year in Europe. Despite improvements in diagnostic and therapeutic tools, these malignant tumours still show high resistance to current treatments. Dr Daniela Thorwarth is working on tailored therapies for individual patients.