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24-06-2019 | © istockphotos.com 2 mins read

Life in the deep – microbes of the abyss

The deep seafloor covers around 70% of our planet’s surface and is home to a diverse community of microorganisms, mostly bacteria. These single-cell life forms inhabit some of the most extreme places in the world, with freezing waters, permanent darkness, high pressure and little food. ERC grantee Antje Boetius studies these microbes in the abyss and their important role for the Earth’s nutrient cycles.

24-06-2019 | © istockphotos.com 2 mins read

Healthy lungs start from your toothbrush

Until recently, lungs were believed to be sterile, but today we know that they are inhabited by microbes migrating from the mouth. Dr Randi Bertelsen has been awarded an ERC grant to investigate the role played by the oral microbiome in lung disease.

29-11-2018 | Pictures and portrait: © Saarland University, HCI Lab 3 mins read

Tech-filled tattoos to interact with the surrounding world

The increasing development of wearable technology sparks the need for new, innovative ways to interact with our shiny gadgets. Deviating from the conventional approach based on touch-sensitive devices, Prof. Jürgen Steimle aims at producing body-worn user interfaces that can be applied directly on the skin. Highly personalised, biocompatible and ultrathin, these devices will seamlessly blend with the human skin to create a technological extension of our body.

17-04-2018 | Image: ©Shutterstock Portrait © Athens University of Economics and Business 2 mins read

Predicting the unpredictable: real time, reliable traffic apps

Travellers already benefit from applications harnessing data from sensor networks and smartphone users. They calculate alternative routes, help plan carpooling routes, or support the optimisation of public transport. With her ERC grant, Prof. Vana Kalogeraki works on a comprehensive software framework that will simplify the development of such mobile human-centred systems and make them more predictable and reliable.

16-04-2018 | Decomposition of a city into “reservoirs” for large-scale simulation © Lyon Metropole - 2015 2 mins read

Towards smarter traffic control

Severe traffic jams not only have an impact on mobility, they also raise environmental and health issues linked to fuel consumption and air and noise pollution. Prof. Ludovic Leclercq is developing new traffic control models that could tackle road congestion while integrating a green dimension.

18-12-2017 | © picture 2 mins read

Learning from Diversity

Could migration lead to more respect for ethnic and cultural diversity not only in receiving communities but also in sending countries? By observing the effects of Polish migration to the UK and Germany, as a result of the country’s entry in the EU in 2004, Prof. Magdalena Nowicka explores possible answers to this question.

02-05-2016 | Research picture: Melting Andean glaciers: view from water reservoir in Chivay (Peru), where water is precious and scarce. ©Astrid Stensrud 2 mins read

Addressing the crises of an ‘overheated’ world

Different responses might be given to global challenges. For example, how should the vanishing of a glacier be tackled? Prof. Thomas Eriksen aims to understand the economic, environmental and cultural transitions the world is going through and the responses created by local communities in order to offer valuable advice to our policymakers and leaders.

01-03-2016 | Illustration ©www.istockphotos.com Portrait © Prof. Ian T. Baldwin in the field 3 mins read

Listening to jet-lagged plants

Prof. Ian Thomas Baldwin received an ERC Advanced Grant to study the internal circadian clock of plants. In particular, he wants to understand the ecological consequences of plants fallings ‘out of synch’. In this interview, Prof. Baldwin shares some of his research findings and explains why he has chosen to make his study results openly available.

18-05-2015 | Portrait:© Inria / Photo J.M. Ramès | Image:© Inria - Photo Poppy Project, M. Lapeyre 4 mins read

Poppy, the 3-D printed robot set to inspire innovation in classrooms

It has long been a sci-fi dream to have a humanoid robot in our everyday life. Soon that dream may seem even more vivid, thanks to Dr Pierre-Yves Oudeyer’s ERC-funded project. His team has developed the first complete open-source 3D printed humanoid robot, called “Poppy”. Poppy is a robot that anybody can build – its body is 3D printed and its behaviour programmed by the user. The technology will be of benefit to the fields of science, engineering, education and even the arts.