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24-05-2019 | ©iStockphoto CIPhotos

Versatile nanoparticles take aim at complex bone diseases

Multifunctional nanoparticles being developed by EU-funded researchers are set to revolutionise treatments for complex bone diseases, enabling novel therapies for hundreds of millions of people worldwide suffering from bone cancer, bacterial bone infections and osteoporosis.

03-08-2018 | Rayleigh Taylor Instability ©DYCON

New approaches to controlling dynamics

Once limited to modelling physical problems in engineering, today Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) are used by a diverse array of fields, from natural resources to meteorology, aeronautics, oil and gas and biomedicine – to name only a few. But key mathematical issues remain unsolved, particularly when addressing their control, a must in technological transfer. The ERC-funded DYCON project aims to find answers.

11-07-2018 | ©Courtesy of MSc. Gizem Altay (IBEC)

Growing intestinal organoids to open new research avenues in gut diseases

Epithelial tissues cover all body surfaces and line most of our organs, internal cavities and passageways, including the digestive tract. Prof. Elena Martínez is engineering intestinal epithelial tissues that mimic the physiological characteristics of human intestinal tissue with the aim of advancing the in vitro modelling of diseases, the preclinical screening for drug efficacy and toxicity, and the understanding of organ development.

02-05-2017 | © picture

Chemical reactions step by step

Chemical reactions are at the core of industrial processes. They are provoked to produce new molecules that will confer the desired properties to products from medicine, to cleaning agents or to fuel. With ERC funding, Prof. Jana Roithova has developed a powerful instrument for chemical analysis that could, in the long run, bring completely new ideas or design for chemical production processes.

25-02-2014 | ©Image - http://www.flickr.com/photos/visitportugal/ (Creative Commons licence)

The movie optometrist: clearer vision for cameras

Lights, camera... action! On the eve of the Oscars, we take a look at an ERC project in the field of film. ERC grantee Marcelo Bertalmío loves cinema so much that he made it the core of his research. A filmmaker himself – he has directed two movies – Dr. Bertalmío is developing a series of image processing algorithms that will create a better and cheaper way to shoot movies, whilst granting more artistic freedom to directors and cinematographers. He is the author of a book, Image Processing for Cinema (2014), which has already received plaudits from the film industry.

27-08-2013 | Cells of coccolithophore genera Gephyrocapsa grown in laboratory culture

Marine algae reveal close link between past climate and CO2

The ocean is filled with microscopic algae that take up carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere in order to grow. A new study by researchers from the Geology Department at the University of Oviedo (Spain) shows that the algae may adapt to rising levels of atmospheric CO2 much sooner than previously thought, and in an unexpected way. This study, published today in Nature and co-authored by ERC grantee Heather Stoll, also provides evidence for a much closer link between atmospheric CO2 decrease and cooling and glaciations in the geological past.

17-12-2012 | © picture

Solution to Nobel Prize winner John Nash’ problem for surfaces

Fifty years after the formulation of a conjecture related to arc spaces of surface singularities by Nobel Prize winner John Nash, the team led by Doctor Javier Fernández de Bobadilla has proved him right. Other topics on Singularity Theory, Algebraic Geometry and Homological Algebra are also studied.

09-07-2012 | Cells of coccolithophore genera Gephyrocapsa grown in laboratory culture

Tiny fossils can lead to huge gains in understanding

The ocean is filled with microscopic algae that take up carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere in order to grow. A new study by researchers from the Geology Department at the University of Oviedo (Spain) shows that the algae may adapt to rising levels of atmospheric CO2 much sooner than previously thought, and in an unexpected way. This study, published today in Nature and co-authored by ERC grantee Heather Stoll, also provides evidence for a much closer link between atmospheric CO2 decrease and cooling and glaciations in the geological past.

20-12-2011 | Microscopy image of a robot with internal reservoir for chemical reagents, By courtesy of F. Štěpánek

The new generation of microscopic robots

Toxic spills can be devastating to humans, animals and to the ecosystem The ERC-funded project CHOBOTIX has successfully created the first prototypes of chemical robots that could serve for "Intelligent Cleaning". These tiny robots could have applications in various fields, from seeking out a source of contamination and neutralise it in toxic waters to treating patients in a more efficient way by delivering them the exact amount of drug without dosing the whole body of patients.