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24-06-2019 | © istockphotos.com 2 mins read

Life in the deep – microbes of the abyss

The deep seafloor covers around 70% of our planet’s surface and is home to a diverse community of microorganisms, mostly bacteria. These single-cell life forms inhabit some of the most extreme places in the world, with freezing waters, permanent darkness, high pressure and little food. ERC grantee Antje Boetius studies these microbes in the abyss and their important role for the Earth’s nutrient cycles.

08-05-2018 | Portrait: © Rob Stevens, KU Leuven, Belgium - Illustration Figure: © Paul Beck, KU Leuven, Belgium - Caption: Starquakes (measured with the NASA satellite Kepler) allowed to discover the spin rate of the cores of red giant stars. 4 mins read

Asteroseismology shakes up theory of stellar evolution

First published on 13-07-2016 Updated on 08-05-2018

What is the lifespan of a sun-like star? Well, it may not be quite what we thought. The outcomes of EU-funded asteroseismology research conducted by Professor Conny Aerts and her team show that the cores of red giants don’t spin nearly as fast as expected – and this, in turn, means that our understanding of the future of our sun was flawed.

05-02-2018 | ©NASA/JPL-Caltech 2 mins read

TRAPPIST-1: findings show exoplanets made of rock and water

In 2016, a team of researchers led by EU-funded astronomer Michaël Gillon at the University of Liège, Belgium, discovered three temperate Earth-sized planets orbiting TRAPPIST-1, an ultra-cool dwarf star just 40 light years from Earth. A few months later, Gillon surprised the world with the discovery of a whole planetary system made of a total of seven planets around this star. A set of new studies reveals today the nature and composition of the planets, shedding light on their potential habitability.

31-07-2017 | © Frank Noé and Thomas Splettstößer, SCIstyle.com 2 mins read

Secrets of protein interactions unveiled

How do proteins trigger complex signal processing tasks, such as neurotransmission, in cells? Thanks to the development of innovative molecular simulation techniques, this ERC-funded project has brought new insights into the transmission of messages inside and between cells.

21-03-2017 | eso1706 1 min read

FIRST IMAGES TAKEN BY EU-FUNDED EUROPA TELESCOPE

Michaël Gillon, astronomer and ERC grantee from the University of Liege, stunned the world with his recent discovery of seven potentially inhabitable planets orbiting Trappist-1 star, some 40 light years from Earth. 

22-02-2017 | © picture and illustration: Utrecht University, The Netherlands 3 mins read

Controlled catalysis for ultra-clean fuels

Catalysts are essential for a lot of chemical production processes, accelerating and enhancing chemical reactions to produce plastics, medicines and fuels more efficiently. Now, thanks to EU-funded research, catalysts are being made more precise and effective with potentially significant benefits for industry and the environment, not least through the development of ultra-clean fuels.

10-05-2016 | © picture 3 mins read

Three habitable Earth-like planets observed by ERC grantee

A team of researchers, led by ERC grantee Michaël Gillon, has discovered three potentially habitable planets that orbit an ultra-cool dwarf star, no further away than 40 light years from Earth.

01-03-2016 | Illustration ©www.istockphotos.com Portrait © Prof. Ian T. Baldwin in the field 3 mins read

Listening to jet-lagged plants

Prof. Ian Thomas Baldwin received an ERC Advanced Grant to study the internal circadian clock of plants. In particular, he wants to understand the ecological consequences of plants fallings ‘out of synch’. In this interview, Prof. Baldwin shares some of his research findings and explains why he has chosen to make his study results openly available.

19-08-2015 | © picture 2 mins read

China and the Historical Sociology of Empire

How can we explain the continuity of Chinese empires? Dr Hilde De Weerdt with her project "Chinese Empire" revisits this big question in world history.

23-04-2015 | © istockphoto.com 3 mins read

What cosmic rays tell us about thunderstorms on Earth

When Prof. Heino Falcke obtained an ERC grant to study and identify the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays, back in 2008, he could not imagine that his research would provide an important clue to better understand lightning and thunderclouds much closer to us. His team indeed realized that cosmic rays, originating in outer space and striking the Earth from all directions, can provide a near instantaneous 'picture' of the electric fields in clouds. The unexpected finding, to be published this week in Physical Review Letters, is the result of a fruitful collaboration between astronomers, particle physicists and geophysicists. The measurements were performed with the LOFAR radio telescope, located in the Netherlands, and partly funded by the ERC.