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01-03-2017 | © Portrait: Reinier Gerritsen | © Illustration: iStockphoto 3 mins read

Pathways to success for second-generation migrants

Many children of migrants, born in their adopted homeland, have successfully overcome the odds and enjoy ‘elite’ status with well paid jobs in EU countries. By studying these individuals, researchers hope to identify how policies and education can be changed to help more second-generation migrants achieve success.

22-02-2017 | © picture and illustration: Utrecht University, The Netherlands 3 mins read

Controlled catalysis for ultra-clean fuels

Catalysts are essential for a lot of chemical production processes, accelerating and enhancing chemical reactions to produce plastics, medicines and fuels more efficiently. Now, thanks to EU-funded research, catalysts are being made more precise and effective with potentially significant benefits for industry and the environment, not least through the development of ultra-clean fuels.

15-06-2016 | © picture 3 mins read

How migration affects children

For millions of young people around the world migration is part of their biographies. Yet we know very little about their mobility throughout their young lives because we’ve focused on just two types of moves: their first move to a new country of residence, or their parents’ migration. Prof. Mazzucato will be trying to understand the mobility patterns of youth with migrant backgrounds and how mobility affects youth's life chances.  And she is the ERC's 500th grantee in the Netherlands. 

04-05-2016 | Portrait picture: ©NWO/Ivar Pel - Research picture: Courtesy of EATINGBODIES team 2 mins read

What is eating?

Living creatures relate to their surroundings in all kinds of ways. One of these is by eating from them and excreting into them. But what is eating? Incorporating other creatures or absorbing nutrients? A need of individual bodies or a pleasure that table companions share? The ERC project EATINGBODIES has explored such questions by studying various forms of eating. 

04-05-2016 | © Katerina Rozakou 2 mins read

Dealing with irregular migration in the 21st century

The starting point of this research project is the disproportionality between the alleged “crime” of being an undocumented migrant and the sanction of deportation. But what determines the ways in which deportation is being implemented on the ground? What are the factors that prevent or expedite implementation?

21-03-2016 | Image: © National Museum of Denmark 2 mins read

International recognition for ERC-funded research in archaeology

During the 3rd and 2nd millennium BC, the European continent experienced important social and cultural transformations, with the introduction of metal and the emergence of new languages and identities. Recent theories suggest that these major changes were triggered by people’s migrations and cultural transmissions, challenging the perception of European prehistory as a series of unrelated local developments.

24-09-2015 | © picture 2 mins read

Widening gap between the rich and poor in European cities

The widening gap between rich and poor is leading to segregation in more and more European cities. The rich and the poor are living at increasing distance from each other, and this can be disastrous for the social stability and competitive power of cities. These are the conclusions of joint research of Prof. Maarten van Ham, ERC grantee at Delft University of Technology, and Prof. Tiit Tammaru, Dr. Szymon Marcińczak and Prof. Sako Musterd.

19-08-2015 | © picture 2 mins read

China and the Historical Sociology of Empire

How can we explain the continuity of Chinese empires? Dr Hilde De Weerdt with her project "Chinese Empire" revisits this big question in world history.

12-06-2015 | Portrait: © Toulouse School of Economics (TSE) | Image: © www.istockphoto.com 2 mins read

Our impact today on tomorrow’s world

Most of our actions can have an impact on the environment, be it minor, long-lasting or simply irreversible. But how can this effect be measured, avoided, predicted? What are the specificities of long-term risks and how can collective decisions be taken effectively to tackle those threats?

11-06-2015 | Portrait: © Eveline Crone | Image: © www.istockphoto.com 2 mins read

What happens in teenagers’ brains?

Adolescence is marked by significant physical, cognitive and socio-emotional changes. Despite these well-known developments, the neural mechanisms supporting this phase of growth in the life of human beings remain unknown. Prof. Eveline Crone has carried out for the first time a longitudinal study to investigate the brain processes underlying the behaviour of teenagers.