You are here

25-09-2019 | © picture 4 mins read

How do you make plants drought-resistant without stunting growth?

Stressed plants typically stop growing. With her ERC grant, Prof. Ana Caño-Delgado has developed and is applying an innovative approach to generate drought-resistant plants that continue growing. This could play an important role in ensuring food security when water is scarce.

24-06-2019 | © istockphotos.com 2 mins read

Your mother’s microbes protect you

Maternal microbiota is crucial for the future health of a child. The transmission of microbes to offspring is a process that begins in the uterus and is influenced by the delivery method, breastfeeding and the mother’s diet. However, the mechanisms behind the protective role of maternal microbes on the baby’s health are not yet fully understood.

28-11-2014 | © Portrait: Courtesy J Coleman 3 mins read

Opening a gateway to industrial solutions

At Trinity College Dublin Professor Jonathan Coleman and his team are creating a ‘gateway technology’ in material science that, if successful, will open the door to a host of industrial applications. Their research focuses on producing two-dimensional monolayers of a variety of materials by exfoliation. Prof. Coleman's TEDx talk will introduce the audience to this technology and demonstrate how to make the 'wonder material' graphene in a kitchen blender.

09-12-2013 | Portrait: ©National University of Ireland; Dr Seán Ó Riain of NIRSA, National University of Ireland, Maynooth | Illustration: ©Iker Merodio 4 mins read

‘New deals’ in the workplace

European countries have different cultures of capitalism and employment. But in the face of challenges like globalisation and the financial crisis, the various models are changing – in different ways. At the National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Professor Seán Ó Riain is using an ERC Starting Grant to understand how European employers and employees are making ‘new deals’ in response to these challenges.

24-07-2012 | ©Leonor Peña-Chocarro 2 mins read

Understanding the origins and spread of agriculture in the western Mediterranean

The first cultivated plants in south-western Europe date back to the first half of the 6th millennium BC. Farmers in this region cultivated a wide variety of crops which included cereals and legumes, as well as other crops such as flax and poppy. They also collected wild plants. Yet, available data from this area is scarce and unevenly distributed across the territory: with blank regions, like northern Morocco, where archaeobotanical data is still almost non-existent.