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20-03-2018 | Our Mythical Childhood, 2013, mixed media on cardboard © Matylda Tracewska

Linking classical antiquity and modern youth culture

How does the past inform the lives of children and young people? A global team of EU-funded researchers is examining this issue by assessing how stories from classical antiquity impact on popular culture and society. The project’s results and outputs will provide valuable resources for scholars and teachers.

27-10-2015 | Image: ©Andrzej Udalsk | Portrait: ©Dr Krzysztof Ulaczyk

Surveying the sky in search for new planets

As empirical experiments are almost impossible in astronomy, research in this field relies heavily on observation. Prof. Andrzej Udalski set new frontiers in observational astronomy, in particular in the search for extra-solar planets, using a cutting-edge gravitational microlensing technique which enables the study of celestial objects irrespective of the light they emit.

19-08-2015 | © picture

When Europeans met Native Americans: cross-cultural transfer in the New World

The discovery, conquest, and subsequent colonization of the Americas gave rise to surprising, multifaceted encounters between the Old and New Worlds. These encounters were not limited to the first-contact phase or to the military subjugation of new lands by the Europeans. They have been long processes of cross-cultural communication—in which both sides participated equally—that continued to develop through the colonial and postcolonial eras up to the present day.

25-02-2013 | ©Andrzej Udalski

New frontiers in observational astronomy

As empirical experiments are almost impossible in astronomy, research in this field relies heavily on observation. Prof. Andrzej Udalski set new frontiers in observational astronomy, in particular in the search for extra-solar planets, using a cutting-edge gravitational microlensing technique which enables the study of celestial objects irrespective of the light they emit.

 

26-07-2012 | © F. d’Errico and L. Backwell, Production of ostrich egg shell beads by a San craftsman

Modern human culture could have emerged 44,000 years ago

In cooperation with the CNRS and University of Bergen When did human behaviour as we know it begin? Work conducted by an international team of researchers suggests that modern culture emerged 44,000 years ago. Their analysis of archaeological material discovered at Border Cave in South Africa has demonstrated that much of the material culture that characterized the lifestyle of San hunter-gatherers in southern Africa was part of the culture and technology of the inhabitants of Border Cave 44,000 years ago. This research, funded by an ERC Advanced Grant, is published in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.