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17-12-2012 | © picture

Solution to Nobel Prize winner John Nash’ problem for surfaces

Fifty years after the formulation of a conjecture related to arc spaces of surface singularities by Nobel Prize winner John Nash, the team led by Doctor Javier Fernández de Bobadilla has proved him right. Other topics on Singularity Theory, Algebraic Geometry and Homological Algebra are also studied.

07-12-2012 | © picture

Testimony on Human Rights Law

December 10 has become a landmark for all human rights’ defenders. It is the day when the international community celebrates UN Human Rights Day to mark the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. A research project led by ERC grantee Professor Lauri Mälksoo, based at the University of Tartu (Estonia), illustrates the significance of human rights in today’s global context by looking at precisely how countries like Russia, understand and practice international law.

22-10-2012 | ©Songquan Deng / Shutterstock.com

How research helps to prevent armed conflicts

During United Nations Disarmament Week (22-28 October 2012), the danger of the arms race and the need for its cessation will be discussed. The project led by Professor Christoph Meyer, an ERC grantee based at King's College in London (UK) is particularly relevant. He recently presented the final results on his ERC-funded project on forecasts for the prevention of armed conflicts.

28-09-2012 | © Mathcard project

Taking mathematics to heart

Mathematics might seem like an abstract discipline, remote from real-world applications but their equations can significantly help understand and simulate the functioning of nature. Professor Alfio Quarteroni of the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL, Switzerland) is leading the Mathcard project in developing mathematical models of the blood flow in our cardiovascular system. On the occasion of World Heart Day, he explains how his project could help surgeons and save lives.

13-09-2012 | ©Grantee's picture: INRIA

Optimised crowd and traffic management: QED!

On the occasion of the European Mobility Week (16-22 September 2012), cities are encouraged to take initiatives to promote a sustainable urban mobility. Noise and air pollution have become sources of concern in many urban areas. Major European cities have to take crowd and traffic management ever more seriously - as populations grow and infrastructure has to cope with rising demand and increased traffic congestion.

30-08-2012 | ©M.J Ventas Sierra & D. Wendland

Reverse engineering in late Gothic vaulted ceilings

The ‘Gothic’ architectural style, which flourished during the high- and late-medieval periods, from the 12th to 16th centuries AD, gave Europe some of its greatest cathedrals, minsters and churches as well as an architectural treasure house of palaces, town halls and guild buildings among others. Importantly, the soaring open spaces conceived and constructed by the architects of the period were only made possible by the innovative ways of designing and constructing ambitious vaulted ceilings. How did those medieval builders go about designing these huge complex monuments? And in an era without computers and design software, how did they set down their visions and transmit them in usable form to the master builders and masons who created them?

26-07-2012 | © F. d’Errico and L. Backwell, Production of ostrich egg shell beads by a San craftsman

Modern human culture could have emerged 44,000 years ago

In cooperation with the CNRS and University of Bergen When did human behaviour as we know it begin? Work conducted by an international team of researchers suggests that modern culture emerged 44,000 years ago. Their analysis of archaeological material discovered at Border Cave in South Africa has demonstrated that much of the material culture that characterized the lifestyle of San hunter-gatherers in southern Africa was part of the culture and technology of the inhabitants of Border Cave 44,000 years ago. This research, funded by an ERC Advanced Grant, is published in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

24-07-2012 | ©Leonor Peña-Chocarro

Understanding the origins and spread of agriculture in the western Mediterranean

The first cultivated plants in south-western Europe date back to the first half of the 6th millennium BC. Farmers in this region cultivated a wide variety of crops which included cereals and legumes, as well as other crops such as flax and poppy. They also collected wild plants. Yet, available data from this area is scarce and unevenly distributed across the territory: with blank regions, like northern Morocco, where archaeobotanical data is still almost non-existent.

11-06-2012 | © picture

Virtual playing pitch to help Ulster rugby heroes

Ulster’s rugby stars, with the help of Queen’s University’s School of Psychology, have been taking part in an exciting new virtual reality project to help improve their tackling technique. The work, which is part of a much larger project funded by the European Research Council, has been developed by Queen’s Professor of Psychology Cathy Craig. She uses virtual reality to understand how expert players deal with deceptive movement on the field of play.

30-04-2012 | © picture

Voters' behaviour under scrutiny ahead of Sunday's French elections

Over 44 million French citizens have the right to vote next Sunday in the second round of the presidential elections. One ERC grantee will be looking at them attentively: Dr Michael Bruter, a political scientist working at the London School of Economics (UK). His research focuses on the deep mystery that surrounds the act of voting, and especially what happens in voters' minds as they stand in the polling booth, ready to place their ballot paper in the box.