You are here

11-09-2019 | © ESA/Hubble, M. Kornmesser

First water detected on potentially habitable planet

Water vapour has been detected in the atmosphere of a remote planet with habitable temperatures. Two ERC grantees at the University College London (UCL) were among the coauthors of study.

25-07-2019 | © picture

Lost and found in the largest structures of the universe

On a clear summer night, look up to the sky and what do you see? Ordinary matter such as planets, stars maybe even an asteroid. Millions of little specks, as far as the eyes can reach. This ordinary matter, also known as baryonic matter, is the primary observable component of our universe. But is what we see all that is out there?

17-05-2018 | Image: © Image courtesy of NRAO/AUI - Portrait: © Damir Fabijanic

New insights into the formation of stars and black holes

Radio astronomy has now entered a “golden age” with new facilities paving the way for significant discoveries on the early universe and the formation and evolution of galaxies. Working on faint radio-signals, Dr Vernesa Smolčić’s research may lead to significant advances in the area. Her goal is to provide the first census of high-redshift star-bursting galaxies, also called “submillimetre galaxies”, and a full census of galaxies hosting supermassive black holes.  

08-05-2018 | Portrait: © Rob Stevens, KU Leuven, Belgium - Illustration Figure: © Paul Beck, KU Leuven, Belgium - Caption: Starquakes (measured with the NASA satellite Kepler) allowed to discover the spin rate of the cores of red giant stars.

Asteroseismology shakes up theory of stellar evolution

First published on 13-07-2016Updated on 08-05-2018

What is the lifespan of a sun-like star? Well, it may not be quite what we thought. The outcomes of EU-funded asteroseismology research conducted by Professor Conny Aerts and her team show that the cores of red giants don’t spin nearly as fast as expected – and this, in turn, means that our understanding of the future of our sun was flawed.

05-02-2018 | ©NASA/JPL-Caltech

TRAPPIST-1: findings show exoplanets made of rock and water

In 2016, a team of researchers led by EU-funded astronomer Michaël Gillon at the University of Liège, Belgium, discovered three temperate Earth-sized planets orbiting TRAPPIST-1, an ultra-cool dwarf star just 40 light years from Earth. A few months later, Gillon surprised the world with the discovery of a whole planetary system made of a total of seven planets around this star. A set of new studies reveals today the nature and composition of the planets, shedding light on their potential habitability.

11-01-2018 | Artist's impression of PicSat in orbit around the Earth. PicSat rendering © Lesia / Observatoire de Paris; Background image T. Pesquet ESA / NASA

Tiny, but not afraid of the big

If you raise your eyes to the sky, you won't see it but you might sense it passing by. On 12 January just before sunrise in Europe, PicSat, a cube satellite as big as a shoebox and barely as heavy as a brick, will be launched from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, India. Supported with a grant from the European Research Council, it is the first nanosatellite to embark on one of the greatest space adventures: exploring, from afar, an exoplanet.

31-05-2017 | Supermassive black holes with masses of about a billion times that of the sun existed by about 12.8 billion years ago. Photo @istockphoto.com

EARLY BLACK HOLES MAY HAVE GROWN IN FITS AND SPURTS

A team of female scientists, including ERC grantee Dr Raffaella Schneider from Sapienza University in Italy found how black holes appeared and grew in the early universe. The lead author of the study was Edwige Pezzulli, a PhD student member of Dr Schneider's ERC-funded team.

Supermassive black holes with masses of about a billion times that of the sun existed by about 12.8 billion years ago.

21-03-2017 | eso1706

FIRST IMAGES TAKEN BY EU-FUNDED EUROPA TELESCOPE

Michaël Gillon, astronomer and ERC grantee from the University of Liege, stunned the world with his recent discovery of seven potentially inhabitable planets orbiting Trappist-1 star, some 40 light years from Earth. 

10-05-2016 | © picture

Three habitable Earth-like planets observed by ERC grantee

A team of researchers, led by ERC grantee Michaël Gillon, has discovered three potentially habitable planets that orbit an ultra-cool dwarf star, no further away than 40 light years from Earth.

27-10-2015 | Image: ©Andrzej Udalsk | Portrait: ©Dr Krzysztof Ulaczyk

Surveying the sky in search for new planets

As empirical experiments are almost impossible in astronomy, research in this field relies heavily on observation. Prof. Andrzej Udalski set new frontiers in observational astronomy, in particular in the search for extra-solar planets, using a cutting-edge gravitational microlensing technique which enables the study of celestial objects irrespective of the light they emit.