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28-08-2012

1174How to entangle two electrons – and do it again and again

Quantum theory, despite being one of the most successful scientific theories in history, throws up some bizarre ideas: quantum spin, the uncertainty principle, wave/particle duality, quantum entanglement and non-locality - or “spooky action at a distance” as Einstein once called it. But these are not just abstract concepts or the preserve of theory: Dr Szabolcs Csonka is working on isolating fundamental particles so as to study these phenomena first hand in electrons and thus bring quantum computers one step closer to reality.

26-07-2012

1172Modern human culture could have emerged 44,000 years ago

In cooperation with the CNRS and University of Bergen When did human behaviour as we know it begin? Work conducted by an international team of researchers suggests that modern culture emerged 44,000 years ago. Their analysis of archaeological material discovered at Border Cave in South Africa has demonstrated that much of the material culture that characterized the lifestyle of San hunter-gatherers in southern Africa was part of the culture and technology of the inhabitants of Border Cave 44,000 years ago. This research, funded by an ERC Advanced Grant, is published in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

24-07-2012

1171Understanding the origins and spread of agriculture in the western Mediterranean

The first cultivated plants in south-western Europe date back to the first half of the 6th millennium BC. Farmers in this region cultivated a wide variety of crops which included cereals and legumes, as well as other crops such as flax and poppy. They also collected wild plants. Yet, available data from this area is scarce and unevenly distributed across the territory: with blank regions, like northern Morocco, where archaeobotanical data is still almost non-existent.

09-07-2012

1170Tiny fossils can lead to huge gains in understanding

The ocean is filled with microscopic algae that take up carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere in order to grow. A new study by researchers from the Geology Department at the University of Oviedo (Spain) shows that the algae may adapt to rising levels of atmospheric CO2 much sooner than previously thought, and in an unexpected way. This study, published today in Nature and co-authored by ERC grantee Heather Stoll, also provides evidence for a much closer link between atmospheric CO2 decrease and cooling and glaciations in the geological past.

29-06-2012

1169How can mucus make systems work more efficiently?

Prof Seunghwan Lee's research project explores the lubrication mechanisms of mucins and mucus gels. He is interested in how systems perform and maintain themselves, with a particular emphasis on the effect of friction, and lubrication, on surface contact. He explained that "in everyday life we recognise that mucus is a slippery substance, but there is very little scientific literature, no systematic understanding of how and why it behaves as it does."©Seunghwan Lee

22-06-2012

1167When molecules become magnets –Roberta Sessoli alla giornata informativa dedicata all'ERC

Many of the electronic gadgets we currently take for granted already use ‘spintronics’ – for instance, the high-capacity hard disks that we find in today’s laptops. With the help of her ERC funding, Professor Roberta Sessoli is advancing our knowledge of the fundamental properties of molecular magnets and quantum spin, research which may lead to new molecular spin-based technologies. Prof Sessoli will attend the conference ERC – 5 years of achievement and the Italian National Information Day on the ERC funding schemes in Rome on 25 June 2012.

20-06-2012

1157Music day 2012: a "best of" ERC projects

How bodily gestures can make music

11-06-2012

1130Virtual playing pitch to help Ulster rugby heroes

Ulster’s rugby stars, with the help of Queen’s University’s School of Psychology, have been taking part in an exciting new virtual reality project to help improve their tackling technique. The work, which is part of a much larger project funded by the European Research Council, has been developed by Queen’s Professor of Psychology Cathy Craig. She uses virtual reality to understand how expert players deal with deceptive movement on the field of play.

30-05-2012

1166World Multiple Sclerosis Day: ERC funded research

No-one fully understands what causes MS. The only consensus is that the immune system becomes hyperactive, attacking the myelin sheath that surrounds the brain's functional cells (neurons). Myelin protects the neurons from damage, and acts as a transmitter of electrical impulses along the nerves. MS causes an inflammation of myelin, and results in scarring.

25-05-2012

1165ERC projects promote a culture of active ageing

The ambition is to create a culture of active ageing across Europe, built on the foundation of a society equipped for all stages of life and with the ultimate aim of strengthening solidarity between the generations.

The chief goals of the European Year for Active Ageing are: